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What are your expectations for the training?

Have you already attended a European TTIP or CETA strategy meeting?

Please shortly describe the work you do on TTIP and CETA in your country (coordination, grassroot organising, giving speeches, lobbying...)

Do you need funding to come? If yes, can you book your own train or flight and be reimbursed later?

 

Multipliers-Training on CETA

October 21, 13pm – 5pm / 22, 9am – 3pm

Brussels

We are happy to invite you to a two days multiplier training on CETA in Brussels on October 21 and22. The multiplier training will take part in the framework of the CETA-Week with many activities going on in Brussels during the week.

For whom : activists and campaigners who want to deepen their knowledge on CETA, the political processes around it and the strategies we can deploy to stop it as a movement. The training is aimed to enable participants to talk about CETA with media, at public events and use the learned knowledge in lobby meetings.

We will offer sessions based on participants needs. This can include :

  • A la Carte Training – What is CETA about?
    Details depending on the precise needs of participants. There will be opportunities for discussion and expert Q&A with European and international experts on CETA its content and how to discuss and how to criticize it.
  • How to stop CETA in the European Parliament
    Strategies and advocacy tactics towards the European Parliament. What we can do to convince MEPs on CETA. What is the state of affairs in the parliament, who are key players and what can we do?
  • Strategic Communication around CETA
    Work on general framing of the CETA discussion. CETA proponents often depict the deal as a golden trade agreement, and use Canada’s popularity to enlist bind support for the deal. Here we will discuss how we can counter this narrative and bust the myths around CETA.

You are warmly invited to take part in the one day training in Brussels. We have a budget to support travels to Brussels where you own organization or network can’t afford to support your trip. Please register here on this page: http://www.s2bnetwork.org/register-ceta-week-multipliers-training/

 http://www.s2bnetwork.org/register-ceta-week-multipliers-training/

 

Canadian trade experts biographies

Dr. Gus van Harten of the Osgood Hall Law School is an award-winning professor teaching Administrative Law, International Investment Law, and Governance of the International Financial System. Previously, van Harten taught at the London School of Economics Administrative Law, International Economic Law, International Commercial Arbitration, and Public International Law. Van Harten is author of the books Sold Down the Yangtze: Canada’s Lopsided Investment Deal with China (2015), Sovereign Choices and Sovereign Constraints: Judicial Restraint in Investment Treaty Arbitration (2013) and Treaty Arbitration and Public Law (2007).

> Senior research fellow Scott Sinclair is Director of the Trade and Investment Research Project of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Sinclair authored numerous books, chapters, and papers including Bad Medicine: Trade Treaties, Privatization and Health Care Reform in Canada (2004); Facing the Facts: A Guide to the GATS Debate (2002); and Putting Health First: Canadian Health Care Reform, Trade Treaties and Foreign Policy (2002), a background study prepared for the Romanow Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada. Prior to joining the Canadian Centre, Scott was a senior trade policy advisor with the Government of British Columbia.

> Senior researcher Stuart Trew of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has been editing the Centre’s monthly journal focusing on the impact of CETA, TTIP and other free trade agreement on government regulations, green energy and workers. Previously, Trew worked at The Council of Canadians as a trade researcher. During that time he published reports, academic papers and many news commentaries on the connections between the free trade regime, social and economic inequality, and climate change.